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Should Apple make a ‘dark theme’ for iOS?

Back when iOS 7 was unveiled there was no shortage of opinions on its looks to be found around the internet. Some people liked the general look of it and some people felt it was is a bit too much. A mixed bag I guess you could say as was to be expected considering it was quite a turnaround difference from that of iOS 6. But at the time, no one had really gone hands-on with it or had the chance to give it some extended use.

Eventually, it got out to the masses and a lot of folks who hated it now loved it and a loved of folks who thought they’d love it hated it. Again, another mixed bag really, as always. But after a while for the most part people get used to change and it’s no longer really an issue. Complaints such as the icons, which you don’t hear too much about about these days in the grand scheme of it all, go away and people continue on.

Just changing the wallpaper and seeing the changes on the UI is enough for me.Fausty82, iMore Forums Member

One thing that still seems to come up though, is the the fact of just how white iOS 7 is. Some would even call it blindingly white and I kind of agree with that myself. Interacting with my iPhone in bed at night unless I adjust the display settings tends to blind me. To be fair, there is also a lot of transparency as well so having the right kind of wallpaper and settings can help reduce the level of whiteness but a lot of the interface isn’t changeable within the OS.

Once you start moving into the default apps like photos and contacts, there is no wallpaper that is going to help. As we know it, a lot of other operating systems allow for such UI elements to be changed and if there was a jailbreak available for iOS, I have no doubt that a lot of people would be using it.

Yes on a dark theme as long as it makes the icons background dark as well.eve6er69, iMore Forums Member

So with that in mind, I took to the iMore Forums to set up a poll asking if folks would like to see a ‘dark theme’ of sorts on iOS, right now the poll indicates, a perhaps unsurprising, yes. They want to see a dark theme put in place so I bring the question to you all as well. Is the white too much? If there was a dark theme option to use would you use it or are you fine with the way things are right now? Have your say in the poll by visiting the iMore Forums.


    







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Moga Ace Power game controller for iPhone is official

Previously rumored, the Moga Ace Power game controller for iPhone is now official. The $99 accessory is now available to reserve online, and offers compatibility with iOS 7 on the iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5 and 5th generation iPod touch.

The controller is expandable and your iPhone sits in the centre, connected by the Lightning connector which also means your phone will charge as you’re playing. Control wise we’re looking at dual analog sticks, a d-pad, 4 action buttons and two triggers on each side. There’s also a headphone jack so you can still listen to your game sounds through a headset. Pretty sweet.

It isn’t going to suit everyone, but Moga makes some pretty impressive game controllers already for Android devices, so it’s at least worth consideration should you be in the market for something like this. Head on over to the source link below to reserve. Anyone buying?

Source: Moga


    







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Rebellion Roundtable: What Was The First UFC You Saw?

Twenty years ago today a bunch of dudes – big dudes, scary dudes, martial arts dudes – climbed into a cage, and in a never-before-seen pay-per-view competition that was more “fall of the Roman Empire” than real athletic endeavor, they beat the ever-loving crap out of each other. That’s right, on November 12, 1993, in Denver, C.O., the Ultimate Fighting Championship was born. And sure, if you were to go into your closet, dust off your old VHS tape of that seminal event, and watch it, what you’d see would be a stark contrast to the evolved and polished product we enjoy today. But dammit, that’s where it all started, this whole billion-dollar industry complete with superstar athletes and TV shows and endless permutations of lifestyle apparel. It all was born on that night.

So in honor of this historic date, Team Rebellion is going to describe their first experiences watching a UFC. As for me, well, on this day 20 years ago, I was in a kempo karate school in Queens, N.Y., being told that this “Ultimate Fighting Challenge crap” was bullshit, because if it was real, the karate guys would literally kill the other competitors. And sadly, I believed it. It wasn’t until I rented the event months later that I realized a few truths: 1) I was an idiot; 2) the kempo karate guys were idiots; and, 3) that I would never miss another UFC again.

 

John Petit, Fighters.com

My friend Dave would always buy the wrestling pay per views and throw parties for his friends to come over. Dave’s parents didn’t care what we did in the basement, so some of us spent the time smoking cigarettes and playing pool and not even stopping to watch any of the wrestling. One night Dave was having a party, and although it wasn’t for a wrestling pay per view, I really didn’t give a shit. Randomly, everyone stopped messing about and decided to watch the main event. This was my first glimpse at the octagon, and some man in his karate pajamas was marching toward the cage in a conga line. Two minutes later he jumped on the back of his opponent and his opponent quit, and I was convinced more than ever that it was as real as the Muppet Show.  Dave and I shared the same birthday, and a few months later we would celebrate it together at his house on the night of UFC 2. That’s when I realized I was a fucking jerk for grouping it with wrestling, and watched every fight besides the opening bout. The Buyrate for UFC 1 was 68,000 people but at least 68,001 claim to have bought it, watched it and fell in love from the first moments. I have no problem saying I wasn’t one of them.

Jorge Hernandez, MMALinker

“I caught a glimpse of The Ultimate Fighter season 2 way back in the day and thought it was the dumbest thing anyone could watch. Growing up as big fan of the WWF and getting into PRIDE FC a little later, the horrid season of TUF left much to be desired, so it took until UFC Fight Night: Florian vs Lauzon for it to really bring some raw emotion out of me.

It was Nate Diaz vs Kurt Pellegrino. I didn’t have any idea how effective submissions could be in a fight before he came back from being bludgeoned for the entire first round, then he finished with a triangle in round two.

To me, the younger Diaz bro is something like Royce Gracie is to people who have been watching since the beginning.”

Mike Prosia, FightLine

UFC 1 was the first event I watched, albeit in 2005.  I bought the Gracie Kool-Aid immediately, and truly believed ‘Gracie Jiu Jitsu’ was an unstoppable force.  It actually took close to a year before I realized that the guy on the bottom of the closed guard wasn’t in a great position.

Casey Hodgin, MMALinker and MMAConvert

I remember this time vividly. I was in my room when my older brother told me I had to come see what was on TV. It was UFC: Wired, a TV show much like UFC: Unleashed. The fight that was on was Martin Kampmann vs. Drew McFedries. I remember hearing Kampmann’s nickname, “The Hitman”, and thinking how awesome of a name that was; especially since he does resemble the actual character from the video-games and movie. Kampmann finished McFedries with an arm-triangle in an impressive comeback. I had no idea how the arm-triangle worked, but it sparked my curiosity which would then lead me to learn more about MMA.

Dana Becker, FightLine and MMAConvert

My first UFC experience wasn’t one to really write home about, but it hooked me in. It was The Ultimate Fighter Finale 7 featuring a main event between Kendall Grove and Evan Tanner. We were visiting family out of state and they put it on, having followed the UFC for several years. As a die-hard sports fan, I just never really gave it much attention. Well, by the end of that card, myself and my wife were hooked and we threw a party later that year for UFC 92: The Ultimate!

Michael Hutchinson, FightLine

Ashamed to admit it, but I was a huge fan of pro-wrestling, and for me, my introduction to MMA was when I heard that Brock Lesner had become UFC Champion, and that he was defending his belt against Shane Carwin. I had heard this news the night of the fight, and asked people in a pro-wrestling forum to give me a stream link to the fights. I saw Brock Lesner get the shit kicked out of him for the first round, just to survive and submit Carwin in the second round. It was more real than pro-wrestling, more entertaining in my eyes, and something that I could be proud to call myself a fan of. I then watched the entire first season of TUF, which Spike was showing re-runs at the time for, which taught me all about the sport, and gave me an introduction to some of the stars, the nature of the sport and how athletically gifted these fighters are. I have been hooked ever since, and now I make sure to never miss an event, no matter how big or small.

Zach Arnold, FightLine

I had been writing about the Japanese side of MMA with UWF-International & Pancrase. I was an avid VHS collector & trader. I spent tons of money trying to network on this front and also buy Japanese magazines Weekly Gong & Weekly Pro-Wrestling. When I saw the first UFC events, I was renting the VHS tapes at my local video store. I had no idea what the hell to make of it. It looked so different than the Japanese fights which were in a ring. The cage made it seem bloodlusting. I bought some of the UFC tapes that I had rented and then I watched the Ultimate Japan show from Yokohama Arena. This was when Kazushi Sakuraba was a young man who had left UWF-International after it fell apart and went into an offshoot group named Kingdom. Sakuraba had been treated as a midcard jobber in New Japan Pro-Wrestling. To see a Japanese guy like Sakuraba fight against the foreigners and stand out blew me away. At that point, there was no going back. I started focusing on the US side of MMA as well as what was happening in Japan. Ultimate Japan was right around the time that the plans for PRIDE were being formulated. When I saw the highlights of the early UFCs on the Fox Sports special celebrating 20 years of UFC, I couldn’t help but smile every time I saw the highlights from the older UFCs. It brought back a lot of memories. I appreciated UFC for the freak show that it was.

Miguel Barragan, FightLine

The very first UFC event I saw was UFC III “The American Dream” in September of 1994, I was 10 years old. I was invited to a neighbors birthday party and his uncle ordered the PPV. I was a huge pro wrestling fan at the time but even as a kid, I knew that was staged. Because of my father, I also followed boxing, so I knew what real punches looked like and the superficial damage they leave, even with gloves. I had heard of this kind of fighting from the first UFC and I knew from then, this was the real deal. Neither gloved boxing, nor choreographed acrobatics, this was a bare knuckle scrap to the bone with as few rules as possible. I recall literally trembling as I watched what I had never witnessed before, two glove-less grown men with martial arts experience duking it out full power. It was like watching those old “Faces of Death” videos because I believed in all of the mystique of the martial arts so blindly, that I thought someone was literally was going to die in that octagon in front of my eyes, and the anticipation of seeing that was not allowing me to turn away. I just had to see it. My heart was pounding as I fully believed one Kung Fu death punch would bring a fatal end to one of these fights. I remember watching Kimo carry that huge cross to octagon to face Royce Gracie and being completely in awe thinking, this guy is going to fucking kill Gracie!! And that was allowed!! After watching that fight end with Royce submitting Kimo with an armbar, I was hooked for life.

Michael Wellman, FightLine

The first UFC I saw was UFC 34: High Voltage.  I was 13 years old and was a huge WWE(F?) fan at the time,  but I wasn’t really interested in UFC.  My parents’ friend Nick brought over his magical cable box one night and was telling me how I needed to quit watching “the fake shit” and check out, you guessed it, “the real shit”.  The BJ Penn vs. Caol Uno fight made me really start paying attention.  Uno tried this crazy leaping spinning kick, and Penn knocked him out cold in all of eleven seconds.  Hughes vs. Newton was up next.  Hughes picked up Newton and slammed him from the top of the fence, knocking him out cold and winning the fight.  Finally, a maneuver I could recognize, the powerbomb.  I remember my parents’ friend Nick immediately started yelling that Hughes got choked out and his falling to the mat was what caused the slam.  Controversy erupted in my living room.  After that fight I was hooked like Tank Abbott’s finger inside the mouth of Oleg Taktarov.

Chris Leslie, MMAFrenzy

I actually got into MMA because of the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta. Seeing a man who looked and sounded like a monster from the pit of Hell make other big men turn into bawling babies left an impression, so I started to read up on wrestling and eventually MMA. Subsequently I came across tapes of UFC 6 and saw Oleg Taktarov. The way he made these guys give up without punches was so awesome I had to see more and thus my UFC connection began with the old MMA tapes. I even had to hide the tapes from my parents to keep them from thinking I was a total sadistic bastard. It all led me to continue watching in my HS wrestling days, but by that I point I was watching a chubby Russian abuse more athletic looking guys.

Michael Midiri, MMFrenzy

Now I know everyone and their mother claims to have been in on this thing since the jump and likes to call everyone else a “TUF Noob” but this is my story and I’m sticking to it. I was 9 or 10 years old, me and a buddy were watching “Kickboxer” and in walks his uncle who told us, “You wana see some real martial arts, come by on Friday and watch this PPV event i am ordering…..”. He was a lifelong Kempo guy but he had heard of this Royce Gracie (emphasis on the R) who was supposed to be all kinds of awesome but he couldn’t really explain to us what this guy Royce did. “He doesn’t throw those jumping split kicks like JCVD? He can’t break a flaming pile of bricks? No death touch? What the hell is the big deal then?”. After watching the event I, like everyone else, was pretty shocked that this little Brazilian guy had won it all but I wasn’t overly excited after seeing what real life fighting looked like. This experience planted the seed though and years later when I happened to catch Ken vs. Tito 1 at a party I was much more entertained. A few years after that was a box of PRIDE VHS tapes I got from a girlfriends brother, it was… enlightening….and scary….and awesome. I had many questions, and among the answers I got were “He’s a cop from Croatia”, “…the W is pronounced as a V”, “…he would kill Chuck”,  and “yes, they allow that shit in Japan..” A few years after that came TUF 1 and the “ZUFFA Boom” and now here I am. Good times!

Tommy Hackett, CagedInsider

I can’t even remember which UFC I watched first! What’s clear in my memory was that dangerous feeling about those first shows. I rented them, which no one does anymore, from a video store, which barely exist, back in the mid 90?s — wondering what I was in for. Credit where it’s due: I want to say Ken Shamrock was on the cover. I was a martial arts fan and a pro wrestling fan — you could say the pro wrestling pageantry was an attraction but the interplay of martial art styles was what eventually got me hooked.

Brendhan Conlan, FiveOuncesofPain

Though I saw some early UFC action via VHS, the first event I genuinely remember sitting down for and watching in its entirety was UFC 44. At the time, my knowledge of the sport was lacking to say the least, so in my mind it was a given Tito Ortiz had Randy Couture’s number based on age and the way each was marketed. Watching Couture overcome the odds and outclass Ortiz was eye-opening to say the least. By the time Couture was clowning the former “Huntington Beach Bad Boy” by delivering a few spanks to his backside, “The Natural” had a new fan and I had a new appreciation for not only the technique involved in MMA but the showmanship as well.

Source: http://mmafrenzy.com/96121/rebellion-roundtable-what-was-the-first-ufc-you-saw/
Category: Mexico vs New Zealand   Cam McDaniel   The Counselor   Prince George christening   pauly d  

Sony’s PlayStation 4 has surely taken over today’s headlines, but that’s not stopping Nintendo from making some news of its own. The company today announced that a YouTube application is coming to the 3DS at long last, giving users a chance to search, browse and watch videos right from the handheld system. What’s more, Nintendo also said the Wii U’s YouTube app will be getting overhauled in the coming weeks, complete with GamePad-focused search features and a variety of user interface enhancements. YouTube for the Nintendo 3DS is expected to arrive in North America and Europe by the end of this month — in the meantime, you can keep watching those Francis rants on one of many other devices.

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/11/13/nintendo-3ds-wii-u-youtube/?ncid=rss_truncated
Related Topics: Florida Georgia Line   tupac   9/11 Pictures   rosh hashanah   ben affleck  

Jessica Lange Confirms Retirement from Acting (Video)

Jessica Lange is retiring from acting. The ‘American Horror Story’ star has confirmed in interviews including the Today Show that she will be calling it quits in favor of other pursuits. The 64-year-old two-time Oscar-winning actress has appeared in many iconic movies including ‘Tootsie,’ ‘Music Box’ and ‘Blue Sky’ since her screen debut in the Fay Wray role in the 1970s remake of ‘King Kong.’ She has also portrayed two tragic historical figures; the Hollywood actress Frances Farmer and country music legend Patsy Cline. For the past few years she has been seen on FX on the critically acclaimed anthology series ‘American Horror Story’ first as Constance Langdon, later as Sister Jude Martin, and in the current season — ‘American Horror Story: Coven’ — as Fiona Goode. In an interview with NBC’s Savannah Guthrie on the ‘Today Show’ (video below) Jessica Lange echoed previous comments in an L.A. Times interview, that she intends to retire from acting. She told the newspaper, “I am coming to the end of acting. I have a list: another stage production, maybe one or two more movies, one more season of “American Horror Story” … and then that is it for me. Because I think [...]Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RightCelebrity/~3/4JDXRyTwUy4/
Category: tlc   Joy Covey   Cal Worthington   Espn.com   VMA Awards  

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7-Nov-2013

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Contact: Todd Murphy
murphyt@ohsu.edu
503-494-8231
Oregon Health & Science University


Vollum Institute scientist publishes two papers on neurotransmission in today’s edition of Nature

PORTLAND, Ore. Research from Oregon Health & Science University’s Vollum Institute, published in the current issue of Nature, is giving scientists a never-before-seen view of how nerve cells communicate with each other. That new view can give scientists a better understanding of how antidepressants work in the human brain and could lead to the development of better antidepressants with few or no side effects.

The article in today’s edition of Nature came from the lab of Eric Gouaux, Ph.D., a senior scientist at OHSU’s Vollum Institute and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. The article describes research that gives a better view of the structural biology of a protein that controls communication between nerve cells. The view is obtained through special structural and biochemical methods Gouaux uses to investigate these neural proteins.

The Nature article focuses on the structure of the dopamine transporter, which helps regulate dopamine levels in the brain. Dopamine is an essential neurotransmitter for the human body’s central nervous system; abnormal levels of dopamine are present in a range of neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, drug addiction, depression and schizophrenia. Along with dopamine, the neurotransmitters noradrenaline and serotonin are transported by related transporters, which can be studied with greater accuracy based on the dopamine transporter structure.

The Gouaux lab’s more detailed view of the dopamine transporter structure better reveals how anti-depressants act on the transporters and thus do their work.

The more detailed view could help scientists and pharmaceutical companies develop drugs that do a much better job of targeting what they’re trying to target and not create side effects caused by a broader blast at the brain proteins.

“By learning as much as possible about the structure of the transporter and its complexes with antidepressants, we have laid the foundation for the design of new molecules with better therapeutic profiles and, hopefully, with fewer deleterious side effects,” said Gouaux.

Gouaux’s latest dopamine transporter research is also important because it was done using the molecule from fruit flies, a dopamine transporter that is much more similar to those in humans than the bacteria models that previous studies had used.

The dopamine transporter article was one of two articles Gouaux had published in today’s edition of Nature. The other article also dealt with a modified amino acid transporter that mimics the mammalian neurotransmitter transporter proteins targeted by antidepressants. It gives new insights into the pharmacology of four different classes of widely used antidepressants that act on certain transporter proteins, including transporters for dopamine, serotonin and noradrenaline. The second paper in part was validated by findings of the first paper in how an antidepressant bound itself to a specific transporter.

“What we ended up finding with this research was complementary and mutually reinforcing with the other work so that was really important,” Gouaux said. “And it told us a great deal about how these transporters work and how they interact with the antidepressant molecules.”

Gouaux’s discoveries over the years in neurotransmission have established him as one of the top investigators in his field. His research has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of not just antidepressants, but also drugs used for the treatment of a wide range of psychiatric and neurological diseases.

###

Gouaux’s co-authors on the dopamine transporter paper were both members of his lab; Aravind Penmatsa, Ph.D., and Kevin Wang, Ph.D.

Gouaux’s co-authors on the second Nature paper were also members or former members of his lab: Hui Wang, Ph.D.; April Goehring, Ph.D.; Kevin Wang, Aravind Penmatsa and Ryan Ressler, Ph.D.

Both papers were funded by the American Heart Association, the National Institute of Mental Health, (1F32MH093120 and 5R37MH070039) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

About the OHSU Vollum Institute

The Vollum Institute is a privately endowed research institute at OHSU and is dedicated to basic research that will lead to new treatments for neurological and psychiatric diseases. Vollum scientists have transformed the field of neuroscience and, in particular, have been pioneers in the study of cellular signaling, neuronal development, gene regulation and the neurobiology of disease.

About OHSU

Oregon Health & Science University is a nationally prominent research university and Oregon’s only public academic health center. It serves patients throughout the region with a Level 1 trauma center and nationally recognized Doernbecher Children’s Hospital. OHSU operates dental, medical, nursing and pharmacy schools that rank high both in research funding and in meeting the university’s social mission. OHSU’s Knight Cancer Institute helped pioneer personalized medicine through a discovery that identified how to shut down cells that enable cancer to grow without harming healthy ones. OHSU Brain Institute scientists are nationally recognized for discoveries that have led to a better understanding of Alzheimer’s disease and new treatments for Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and stroke. OHSU’s Casey Eye Institute is a global leader in ophthalmic imaging, and in clinical trials related to eye disease.



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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

7-Nov-2013

[

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]


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Contact: Todd Murphy
murphyt@ohsu.edu
503-494-8231
Oregon Health & Science University


Vollum Institute scientist publishes two papers on neurotransmission in today’s edition of Nature

PORTLAND, Ore. Research from Oregon Health & Science University’s Vollum Institute, published in the current issue of Nature, is giving scientists a never-before-seen view of how nerve cells communicate with each other. That new view can give scientists a better understanding of how antidepressants work in the human brain and could lead to the development of better antidepressants with few or no side effects.

The article in today’s edition of Nature came from the lab of Eric Gouaux, Ph.D., a senior scientist at OHSU’s Vollum Institute and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. The article describes research that gives a better view of the structural biology of a protein that controls communication between nerve cells. The view is obtained through special structural and biochemical methods Gouaux uses to investigate these neural proteins.

The Nature article focuses on the structure of the dopamine transporter, which helps regulate dopamine levels in the brain. Dopamine is an essential neurotransmitter for the human body’s central nervous system; abnormal levels of dopamine are present in a range of neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, drug addiction, depression and schizophrenia. Along with dopamine, the neurotransmitters noradrenaline and serotonin are transported by related transporters, which can be studied with greater accuracy based on the dopamine transporter structure.

The Gouaux lab’s more detailed view of the dopamine transporter structure better reveals how anti-depressants act on the transporters and thus do their work.

The more detailed view could help scientists and pharmaceutical companies develop drugs that do a much better job of targeting what they’re trying to target and not create side effects caused by a broader blast at the brain proteins.

“By learning as much as possible about the structure of the transporter and its complexes with antidepressants, we have laid the foundation for the design of new molecules with better therapeutic profiles and, hopefully, with fewer deleterious side effects,” said Gouaux.

Gouaux’s latest dopamine transporter research is also important because it was done using the molecule from fruit flies, a dopamine transporter that is much more similar to those in humans than the bacteria models that previous studies had used.

The dopamine transporter article was one of two articles Gouaux had published in today’s edition of Nature. The other article also dealt with a modified amino acid transporter that mimics the mammalian neurotransmitter transporter proteins targeted by antidepressants. It gives new insights into the pharmacology of four different classes of widely used antidepressants that act on certain transporter proteins, including transporters for dopamine, serotonin and noradrenaline. The second paper in part was validated by findings of the first paper in how an antidepressant bound itself to a specific transporter.

“What we ended up finding with this research was complementary and mutually reinforcing with the other work so that was really important,” Gouaux said. “And it told us a great deal about how these transporters work and how they interact with the antidepressant molecules.”

Gouaux’s discoveries over the years in neurotransmission have established him as one of the top investigators in his field. His research has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of not just antidepressants, but also drugs used for the treatment of a wide range of psychiatric and neurological diseases.

###

Gouaux’s co-authors on the dopamine transporter paper were both members of his lab; Aravind Penmatsa, Ph.D., and Kevin Wang, Ph.D.

Gouaux’s co-authors on the second Nature paper were also members or former members of his lab: Hui Wang, Ph.D.; April Goehring, Ph.D.; Kevin Wang, Aravind Penmatsa and Ryan Ressler, Ph.D.

Both papers were funded by the American Heart Association, the National Institute of Mental Health, (1F32MH093120 and 5R37MH070039) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

About the OHSU Vollum Institute

The Vollum Institute is a privately endowed research institute at OHSU and is dedicated to basic research that will lead to new treatments for neurological and psychiatric diseases. Vollum scientists have transformed the field of neuroscience and, in particular, have been pioneers in the study of cellular signaling, neuronal development, gene regulation and the neurobiology of disease.

About OHSU

Oregon Health & Science University is a nationally prominent research university and Oregon’s only public academic health center. It serves patients throughout the region with a Level 1 trauma center and nationally recognized Doernbecher Children’s Hospital. OHSU operates dental, medical, nursing and pharmacy schools that rank high both in research funding and in meeting the university’s social mission. OHSU’s Knight Cancer Institute helped pioneer personalized medicine through a discovery that identified how to shut down cells that enable cancer to grow without harming healthy ones. OHSU Brain Institute scientists are nationally recognized for discoveries that have led to a better understanding of Alzheimer’s disease and new treatments for Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and stroke. OHSU’s Casey Eye Institute is a global leader in ophthalmic imaging, and in clinical trials related to eye disease.



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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/ohs-ovi110713.php
Tags: jennifer lawrence   thursday night football   time change   Malcom Floyd   remembering 9/11  

The Man in Black in Living Color

Hilburn and Cash
“Moments before going onstage at Folsom, Cash suddenly felt calm. ‘There was something in their eyes that made me realize everything was going to be ok,’ he said of the audience. ‘I felt I had something they needed.’ ” Robert Hilburn, at Cash’s side, covered the concert for the Los Angeles Times.

Photo courtesy Jim Marshall Photography LLC

In the 10 years since Johnny Cash died, the Man in Black has arguably been more culturally present than he ever was while alive. Hollywood has something to do with this, of course, giving us the strenuous portrayal by Joaquin Phoenix in 2005’s Walk the Line, the big-screen version of the Cash legend. A year after that, there he was again, scoring a chart-topping country album, the Rick Rubin–produced American V: A Hundred Highways—and again four years after that, when the next installment of the Cash brand, American VI, debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard album chart. His face has been slapped on countless envelopes since the U.S. Postal Service dedicated a stamp to him in June. And Cash music just keeps coming: several discs worth of previously unreleased recordings, back-catalog albums reissued by the score, greatest hits collections and box sets now numbering into the dozens, one for every price point—if you’ve got the money, pick that 63-disc Columbia Records box.

Or perhaps you’re in the market for a Johnny Cash book? There was already a shelf full, a pair of autobiographies among them, before Cash passed in 2003. Since then, nearly 50 additional titles have been published, everything from biographies (at least seven) to memoirs (including ones from his son John Carter, his daughter Rosanne, and his longtime bass player Marshall Grant) to in-depth analyses of specific albums—to a Johnny Cash reader, a cookbook, and even a graphic novel. There are several Cash photo books available, too, probably the most beautiful being the just-released coffee-table volume called Life Unseen: Johnny Cash, An Illustrated Biography. And there are quite a few deep-thoughts tomes, as well, usually with names like Johnny Cash and Philosophy: The Burning Ring of Truth.

So when I heard that another Cash book was on the way, this one a doorstop biography by longtime Los Angeles Times music journalist Robert Hilburn, I must admit that my first weary thought was: “Do we really need another Johnny Cash book?”

Yes, we really do, as it turns out, because Johnny Cash: The Life is so very good. I won’t sign off on “definitive,” as the book’s back cover proclaims, for reasons I’ll explain in a bit. But Hilburn’s work is far and away the most insightful, entertaining, comprehensive, and well-told Cash biography to date.

By now even casual fans are familiar with the broad-brush version of Cash’s story: his older brother’s death when he was little, haunting him down the years; the country and rockabilly hits in the 1950s followed by more crossover hits in the ’60s and ’70s; the famed prison concerts and the TV series—but also the addiction to a variety of pills; the long, tumultuous, and loving professional collaboration with June Carter Cash; and finally, following a lengthy period of artistic and commercial irrelevancy, the late-in-life second act that allowed Cash to reconnect with a young audience and to resuscitate his near-dead reputation as a rebellious-yet-moral American artist.

All this is consistent with the story Hilburn tells. But Hilburn also helps us see the Man in Black in something nearer to living color. It is not a pretty picture. Cash could be petty and insecure, and he was sheltered and self-centered in ways that only wealthy celebrities get away with for long. Cash got away with it, mostly, for much of his adult life, which is not at all to suggest that he and those closest to him weren’t paying heavy prices for his behavior straight along.

Cash was a neglectful and frequently frightening father to his children, and to June’s. “We’d wake up and find the kitchen was on fire because he done something wrong while making breakfast,” Carlene Carter, a future country artist in her own right, tells Hilburn of life with her stepfather when she was a girl. “Or he’d show up without his key and take an axe to the front door.”

Cash was, if not a serial liar, then at least a chronic embellisher: Some version or other of “[Cash] wasn’t inclined to let the facts get in the way of a good story” becomes almost a mantra in the book. He treated his first wife cruelly; he had a not-so-secret affair with Billie Jean Horton, the widow of his dear friend Johnny Horton, and a longstanding not-secret-at-all affair with the woman who became his second wife, June Carter. His pill-popping nearly killed him on several occasions, and it persisted late into his life.

I could go on but won’t. Suffice it to say, for long stretches of Johnny Cash: The Life, the protagonist comes off like a real asshole. If he weren’t Johnny Cash, I’d hate him.

Of course, he is Johnny Cash, so I like him very much, flaws and all. Partly that’s because I come to the book, as I suspect most readers will, deeply invested in Cash’s music. It’s also because I know the story will end about as well as could be imagined—and Hilburn’s accounting of Johnny and June’s final frail days together is tremendously moving. At times he almost seems to be in the room with them, and perhaps he was: A key to Hilburn’s success here is that he knew the Cashes personally from 1968 on—he was the only music journalist to cover the recording of Live at Folsom Prison—and interviewed them many, many times, including talks that took place not long before their deaths. Hilburn’s decadeslong commitment to the Cash story is surely one reason why so many of Cash’s friends, associates, and family members—including Johnny and June’s only child, John Carter Cash—not only shared their memories with Hilburn for the project, but granted the author access to Cash’s and their own personal correspondence.

The letters to his wives and his children, and the annual letters he for years wrote to himself around Christmastime, are among the main reasons readers will root for Cash, even when he’s just been at his worst. “Yes, congratulations John Cash on your superstardom,” he chides himself in a 1972 note. “Big deal!” He cops to his faults and beats himself up for his failures. Again and again, the letters show a man trying very hard—imperfectly, and only intermittently—to be a better father, a better husband and Christian, a better man. “You stayed off pills but you’re still awfully carnal,” he tells himself in 1968. “You know what those little vices of yours are … You need to pray more. You hardly ever pray. Big deals ahead in 1969, possibly a network TV show, but the biggest thing you’ve got is your family and home. You’d better hang with God … ”


Chris Hadfield’s Lessons from Life in Orbit

Retired astronaut Chris Hadfield, author of the new book An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth, has flown three space missions, including 144 days on the International Space Station. Hadfield talks about life in zero gravity, his one fear while in orbit, and how he went from test pilot to astronaut.

Source: http://www.npr.org/2013/11/01/242356999/chris-hadfields-lessons-from-life-in-orbit?ft=1&f=1032
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Brian Cranston narrates ‘Big History’ exploration


NEW YORK (AP) — Bryan Cranston has an authoritative voice, which all by itself would qualify him to narrate “Big History.”

But there’s another reason Cranston is a fine choice for this new docuseries, which pledges to reveal “one grand unified theory” for how every event in history (13.7 billion years of it) is intertwined by science. Cranston, after all, starred in the recently concluded drama “Breaking Bad” as Walter White, the nation’s favorite psychotic former high-school chemistry teacher.

“Walt was a passionate teacher,” Cranston says with a laugh, “and even through the dastardly deeds that he found himself doing later on, he was still a teacher: He taught Jesse the chemistry of cooking meth.”

“Breaking Bad” is behind him, and now, in Cranston’s current TV project, he is as much student as teacher as he confronts each script for the 16-episode-plus-finale series, which premieres Saturday at 10 p.m. EDT on the H2 network (an extension of the History channel).

“The series uses science and history to show how various things that we take for granted these days had their origins thousands of years ago,” Cranston says by phone from the Los Angeles studio where he is busy taping his commentary.

Two half-hour episodes of “Big History” will air on premiere night.

“The Superpower of Salt” reveals its subject to be far more than the thing you cut down on if you have high blood pressure.

“New York City wouldn’t be the city that it is without salt,” Cranston declares in the episode. Moreover, salt helped determine the road system of America and beyond: It “has silently engineered our global map.”

Salt’s all-important role in animal life was demonstrated eons ago by the genesis of the egg, a portable container for salty water that allowed a creature to leave the sea for dry land to procreate there. (Even the amniotic sack in the womb serves as a personal ocean for the fetus, he notes.)

The second episode, “Horse Power Revolution,” makes clear the noble equine’s legacy goes deeper than pulling a plow and toting Paul Revere on his midnight ride.

It was early nomads in Central Asia some 6,000 years ago who first rode horses, Cranston reports.

Among many unexpected benefits the horse spurred was pants. Citizens of ancient Rome wore tunics, which were impractical for riding horses, as Roman soldiers must have realized anew while battling barbarian enemies who sported this sartorial innovation. The Roman cavalry soon got on board. From there, pants became the rage for clotheshorses the world over.

Prior to the H2 series, Big History began as a course developed to help students better understand the world by revealing “big picture” connections between different fields of study. A free, online version is available online.

“I love learning how a moment in history carries through to today’s life,” says Cranston.

Asked what kind of student he was during his school years, he recalls, “I was good when I wanted to be. And I could get enthused about any subject if a teacher made it come alive.

“That’s what this series does. It describes the relationship we have to our history. It explains how and why this is important to ME. That’s what’s key!”

___

EDITOR’S NOTE — Frazier Moore is a national television columnist for The Associated Press. He can be reached at fmoore@ap.org and at http://www.twitter.com/tvfrazier.

___

Online:

http://www.history.com/shows/h2

http://www.bighistoryproject.com

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/brian-cranston-narrates-big-history-exploration-122342801.html
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The Coolest Movie of All Time

Brigitte Bardot as Camille, Michel Piccoli as Paul Javal in Jean Luc Godard's Contempt
Brigitte Bardot and Michel Piccoli in Jean-Luc Godard’s Contempt.

Courtesy of Lions Gate Home Entertainment

For a nuanced critical consideration of Jean-Luc Godard’s Contempt, see the Phillip Lopate essay in which he describes the director striking “his deepest human chords” therein. For a view that reads this adaptation of an Alberto Moravia novel in the context of its production and the director’s career, see Richard Brody’s book Everything Is Cinema. For kicks, contemplate its substance—its story of a writer (Michel Piccoli) whoring out himself and perhaps his wife (Brigitte Bardot) to a wolfish movie producer (Jack Palance)—as a superlative statement of hep ethics and aesthetics. For your consideration: Contempt—released as Le Mepris in Godard’s France and Il Disprezzo in Moravia’s Italy, where it debuted to the world 50 years ago this week—ranks as the coolest movie of all time.

Is this point debatable? Mais oui. There are several cases to be made that it is not even the coolest movie made in France in the 1960s. You could put in a word for Jules et Jim, but I would observe that François Truffaut’s sentimentalism is a softer and squishier thing than Godard’s brilliant cynicism; Contempt’s alienated hero somehow makes alienation itself look heroic. Or you might nominate Last Year at Marienbad instead, in which case I’ll say that you’re privileging obscurantist avant-garde chic over the clarity and classicism of a film about a film remake of the Odyssey. If you were to argue that Le Samouraï, Jean-Pierre Melville’s lean-bodied hit-man procedural, beats Contempt for surface tension and deep sangfroid, I would say you might have a point there. And yet you would concede that Godard’s early features constitute film’s greatest sustained achievement in attractive detachment, raffish charisma, and photographing bangs.

Brigitte Bardot in Contempt
Brigitte Bardot in Contempt.

Courtesy of Lions Gate Home Entertainment

Inventing the jump cut, choreographing the Madison, costuming Eddie Constantine in a trench coat—these are obvious in their coolness, but obviousness is not cool (obviously). Contempt’s comparatively nonchalant attitude toward innovation—the relative subtlety of its freshness—thus earns special distinction. A typical Godard film of that period, only averagely supercool, would situate Anna Karina as an understated sex symbol in a brashly just-ahead-of-the-moment scenario. Here, compelled by his producers to exploit the form of unsubtle Bardot, he anatomizes her curves and analyzes our gaze, eating his cheesecake and having it too. Contempt is the most conventional film of Godard’s New Wave period and the least overt in its poses—except when Piccoli, putting his thinking cap on, very literally poses as Dean Martin in Some Came Running, a bit of mimicry figuring in a grand scheme of movie love and the unforced analysis of it.

Which brings us to Fritz Lang, who plays himself as the director of the film within the film. Both Samuel Fuller and Woody Allen will tell you that Godard is a great director of directors, and from Lang he here elicits some weathered drolleries, a spirit of calm control, and the easy dignity of old grandeur. In a recent piece on Contempt, Brody mentioned Lang’s pinstriped suit in connection with the idea that the charm of Godard’s own personal style manifests in his characters’ “reserved expressiveness”—“a steadiness that is non-theatrical but in no way natural.” That is one definition of cool, and Lang’s sense of self-possession is another.

Piccoli’s hero is moving in pursuit of this quality. He also wants money and integrity and renown, but to look at him looking at Lang is to know that the old man’s crisp serenity of style is the grand prize. He won’t win it, however, no matter how much he fusses with his hat, and we might see why by extending a Godard remark about film into the spiritual dimension. “To me,” the director once said, “style is just the outside of content, and content the inside of style, like the outside and the inside of the human body.” This is the transcendental school of cool, and Contempt is its central text.

Source: http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/cool_story/2013/10/the_coolest_movie_of_all_time_is_jean_luc_godard_s_contempt.html
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